Posted by truancy

State Truancy Laws

Although states vary in their responses to truancy, their laws in defining truancy are fairly similar. Below are some examples for various states.

Here is a good truancy guide by DC.gov for those interested in learning more about prevention.

CALIFORNIA: Any school-aged child who is absent from school without valid excuse three full days in one school year or tardy or absent for more than any 30-minute period during one school day on three occasions during the school year or any combination thereof is considered truant and should be reported to the supervisor of the school district.

CONNECTICUT: A truant is a child between the ages of five and 18 who is enrolled in any public or private school and has four unexcused absences in a month or 10 in any school year. A HABITUAL truant is a child of the same age who has 20 unexcused absences from school during a school year.

ILLINOIS: A truant is defined as any child subject to compulsory schooling and who is absent from school unexcused. Absences that are excused are determined by the school board. A chronic or habitual truant is a school-age child who is absent without valid cause for 10 percent out of 180 consecutive days. The truant officer in Illinois is responsible for informing parents of truancy and referring the case to juvenile court.

LOUISIANA: Any student between the ages of seven and seventeen is required to attend school. A student is considered truant when the child has been absent from school for five school days in schools operating on a semester system and for ten days in schools not operating on a semester basis. A student may be referred to juvenile court for habitual absence when all reasonable efforts by school administrators have failed and there have been five unexcused absences in one month. The school principal or truancy officer shall file a report indicating dates of absences, contacts with parents, and other information.

VIRGINIA: Any student between the ages of five and 18 is subject to compulsory school attendance. After a pupil has been absent for five days during the school year without a valid excuse, a notice is sent to parents outlining the consequences of truancy. A conference with school officials and parents is arranged within fifteen school days of the sixth absence. Once a truant has accumulated more than seven absences during the school year, the case will be referred to juvenile and domestic relations court.

WASHINGTON STATE: Washington law defines an unexcused absence as the student’s failure “to attend the majority of hours or periods in an average school day or [failure] to comply with a more restrictive school district policy, and [failure] to meet the school district’s policy for excused absences.”17 Although the law specifies a minimum criterion for the definition of an unexcused absence, it also allows for the use of more restrictive district definitions. This discretion introduces variability into the identification of chronically truant students throughout the state.

Need a business listing – click here

Truancy laws and definitions constantly change.  Please check with your local school district officials for the latest news and law information in your area.

  • Articles

  • RSS White House.gov Blog Feed

    • A Call Answered: Unlocking America's Cell Phones July 25, 2014
      Last year, over 114,000 of you made your voice heard and petitioned the Administration to restore a basic consumer freedom: to take your mobile service — and a phone or tablet you already own — to the carrier that best suits your needs.  It's common sense, good for competition and innovation, and essential to consumers.  That's why the Administrati […]
    • Celebrating 24 Years of the Americans with Disabilities Act July 25, 2014
      Tomorrow marks the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- a landmark law that transformed American society for people with disabilities. It provided for full participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency for those of us living with disabilities, and also provided Americans with disabilities with legal remedies to […]
    • More than 3.81 Million Records Released July 25, 2014
      In September 2009, the President announced that—for the first time in history—White House visitor records would be made available to the public on an ongoing basis. Today, the White House releases visitor records that were generated in April 2014. This release brings the total number of records made public by this White House to more than 3.81 million—all of […]
    • Making the Business Case for Rural America July 25, 2014
      Ed. note: This is cross-posted from the USDA Blog, see the original post here. These days, it seems like it’s easier than ever to turn a good idea into reality. This is the era of Kickstarter, where entrepreneurs can connect with potential investors at the click of a button. Of course, it takes more than money to grow an idea. It takes an atmosphere that fos […]
    • A Day in the Life: Deric from Baltimore July 25, 2014
      Meet Deric. Deric Richardson had been out of work for over a year. He had a GED and a Microsoft Office certificate, but needed an opportunity to improve his skills. That opportunity came in the form of tuition-free training in laboratory skills provided by the nonprofit BioTechnical Institute of Maryland. Shortly after successfully completing the training, D […]